Aboriginal Sacred Sites

Definition of a Sacred Site:

"Sacred site" means a site that is sacred to Aboriginals or is otherwise of significance according to Aboriginal tradition, and includes any land that, under a law of the Northern Territory, is declared to be sacred to Aboriginals or of significance according to Aboriginal tradition. - Aboriginal Land Rights (Northern Territory) Act 1976, Part VII, s.69

Sacred Sites are related to Aboriginal Mythology, also called the ‘Dreamtime’ or ‘Dreaming’.  Aboriginal Sacred Sites are spirit centres for aboriginal people as well as animals and plants. They can be trees, rocky outcrops, waterholes or clearings; anywhere that the ancestral spirits, human or otherwise, are associated with. Some ancestral spirits left their human energy or spirit at these sites and/or in the form of plants or animals.

Basically a sacred site is formed by a mythological event. To enter a sacred site one must be initiated and ceremonies relating to the mythological event are often held at or near them.  The objective of having these ceremonies is to get the ancestral being to send out the life energy or spirits of the sacred site, so they can cooperate with nature at just those seasons when the increase of particular species should occur.

There are male sacred sites (men’s business) which are forbidden to women and women’s sacred sites (women’s business) which are forbidden to men.

Uluru (Ayers Rock) and Kata Tjuta (the Olgas) are two very important Aboriginal Sacred Sites found in Central Australia.

Aboriginal Culture >>

 Aboriginal Initiation Rites>>

 Aboriginal Ceremonies >>



 

 
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